Kaydol

Flood göndermek, insanların floodlarını okumak ve diğer insanlarla bağlantı kurmak için sosyal Floodlar ve Flood Yanıtları Motorumuza kaydolun.

Oturum aç

Flood göndermek, insanların floodlarını okumak ve diğer insanlarla bağlantı kurmak için sosyal Floodlar ve Flood Yanıtları Motorumuza giriş yapın.

Şifremi hatırlamıyorum

Şifreni mi unuttun? Lütfen e-mail adresinizi giriniz. Bir bağlantı alacaksınız ve e-posta yoluyla yeni bir şifre oluşturacaksınız.

3 ve kadim dostu 1 olan sj'yi rakamla giriniz. ( 31 )

Üzgünüz, Flood yazma yetkiniz yok, Flood girmek için giriş yapmalısınız.

Lütfen bu Floodun neden bildirilmesi gerektiğini düşündüğünüzü kısaca açıklayın.

Lütfen bu cevabın neden bildirilmesi gerektiğini kısaca açıklayın.

Please briefly explain why you feel this user should be reported.

If a hard drive’s PCB firmware chip is destroyed, can another PCB be programmed to work?

I realize the most important part of trying to repair a hard drive’s PCB is by swapping the firmware chip to a new one.

But what if that firmware chip itself is what is destroyed and non-functional? Is it possible to somehow program a new PCB’s firmware to cooperate with the drive so data can potentially still be read? Without having to attempt a full swap of platters and similar?

I ask in reference to an old SATA drive that had no backup but a lot of original HLTV game captures from old games, that aren’t available anywhere else.

Benzer Yazılar

Yorum eklemek için giriş yapmalısınız.

4 Yorumları

  1. If your drive is really old (early 2000) – perhaps you really able to just swap boards without rewriting configuration data specific for just exact drive as in modern ones.

    But actually there are very low chances what firing your drive destroys just the board and not all other components also.

    If it gone so far – your only hope is to call repair companies – some of them able to deal with just the disks itself without other original hardware (the older the better). But I unsure what game captures may worth its price. Make backups next time, it it does.

  2. Yes, but also No.

    The problem here is that you need something to write to the EEPROM on the new PCB, if the previous one was destroyed, then you have nothing to make a copy of. If you could generate a new ROM image to program to the EEPROM, then yes, but lacking true industrial tools, you’re not gonna do that.

  3. It’s doable and has worked in the past for me anyway.

  4. If it’s important, send it to a pro. It is possible to swap if you get an exact donor board from another drive, but there’s no guarantee it will work.