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Flood göndermek, insanların floodlarını okumak ve diğer insanlarla bağlantı kurmak için sosyal Floodlar ve Flood Yanıtları Motorumuza kaydolun.

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Flood göndermek, insanların floodlarını okumak ve diğer insanlarla bağlantı kurmak için sosyal Floodlar ve Flood Yanıtları Motorumuza giriş yapın.

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3 ve kadim dostu 1 olan sj'yi rakamla giriniz. ( 31 )

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Drive Failure Over Time: The Bathtub Curve Is Leaking

Drive Failure Over Time: The Bathtub Curve Is Leaking

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  1. And then there are the inevitable reports on how Amazon ships bare drives…

  2. In everyday PC’S you don’t see numbers like this. Unless you are running drives 24/7 these figures are largely irrelevant. There are many variables in day to day usage. Workload, temperature, start/stop cycles.

  3. 6 years is like 50kh MTBF (roughly).

    I remember disks which claimed had 100-300kh MTBF.
    That was 1990. And disk capacity around 200-500MB and spin speeds like 3200 or something…

  4. Obviously I don’t have near the drives that backblaze does, but even with my small sample of ~40 drives, I can easily tell the difference. I also fear the day they start to fail.

  5. this stuff doesn’t really seem useful to me since most use cases for a hard drive are wildly different than the lab settings of backblaze or any company could possibly be.

    it makes for a good ‘baseline’ but it’s hardly a standard that i would consider worthwhile.

  6. >[back in 2013,](https://www.backblaze.com/blog/drive-failure-over-time-the-bathtub-curve-is-leaking/#:~:text=back%20in%202013) the 80% of the drives installed would be expected to survive four years. That fell to 50% after six years. In 2021, the life expectancy of a hard drive being alive at six years is 88%. That’s a substantial increase

    and yet, Backblaze has *increased* their Backup service price by 40% over the same period (from [$5/mo.](https://www.backblaze.com/blog/unlimited-cloud-backup-still-5-month/) to [$7/mo.](https://www.backblaze.com/blog/subscription-changes-for-computer-backup/)). While still a good deal for backups over ~1TiB, it seems excessive given the substantial decrease in Backblaze’ capex.

    Edit: Lots of good discussion, which was the point of this post (Cunningham’s Law).

  7. I feel uneasy seeing the opening image, somehow it invokes an image of a hard drive falling into an actual bathtub filled in water…

  8. Love the backblaze posts.

    The amazing piece for me is the virtual elimination of infant mortality of these hard drives (and honestly – this probably extends to a large number of engineered items over the past decade or so.)

    I suspect it is a reflection of the advancement of systems engineering and advanced computer modeling of all these components and systems. Amazing stuff.