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100+TB SSDs could appear next year as Micron debuts breakthrough flash memory

100+TB SSDs could appear next year as Micron debuts breakthrough flash memory

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  1. 100TB SSDs are already a reality. They’re just really expensive and the hyper-scalars have exclusivity agreements. Our latest standard configs are rolling with 36TB drives now. Flash has been cheaper than SATA in the Enterprise for two years now. When you factor in inline compression, deduplication, and compaction, we routinely see 3:1, sometimes as high as 5:1. The Only Exception is AI / Ml – for those data sets sata is still relevant.

  2. Still not enough storage for Call of Duty: Modern Warfare

  3. So, is this going to actually happen, or are things going to continue on the path of a terabyte every year or two, separated by time for the costs to come down due to early adopters buying them?

  4. For most people the exciting part of this is probably cheaper super fast, and large, SSDs to make their PCs and devices faster without sacrifice storage space. For me though, it’s the thought that one day I won’t need an entire shelf of easystore with a bunch of fans to keep them cool.

  5. I’ll take two please…here’s my first born.

  6. Nimbus already launched 100TB last year for an ungodly price.

    They stuffed QLC NAND into several layers and stuffed it into a SATA disk sized container

  7. >that will hopefully trickle down to the end user.

    Yes….trickle it down….to my nas…..

  8. I read these articles, about Toshiba, 120TB.

    In 2014….

  9. Why not just use the 3.5 inch form factors? I’d happily put them in my homeserver

  10. I will get excited when I can order my 100TB SSD for same as current most expensive drive I can afford the 14TB easystore on sale.

  11. I don’t need more than 100TB (yet). Can we please have cheap 100TB drives?

  12. Well damn. I’m still waiting for 4TB SSD’s from Samsung’s T series to come to a reasonable price.

  13. Bullshit article by an incompetent “journalist” at a clickbait site.

  14. 100tb for $10,000? So $100 per tb. Which is where we are now basically. How do they figure that is way cheaper?

  15. Can’t wait to replace spinners in all the NAS’s with SSDs.

  16. An article exactly like this has come out every six months for fifteen years.

  17. Ok so Micron now hits *exactly* the same number of layers as Samsung aims for in their next generation… I’m suspicious. And worried.

  18. 2.4pb in a 2u server… mmm

    might have to mortgage the house

  19. While technically being SSD’s these would be slower than current SSDcs

  20. I wonder who the target audience is for these?

    Surely all that nand could max out a pcie4x4 connection? Using 4 drives at 25tb a piece would seem a more reasonable solution?

    Or are there applications where companies say 20pb of flash in this rack isn’t enough! I need 200pb no matter the cost!

  21. > The 100TB ExaDrive DC SSD, the largest solid state drive currently on the market, is likely to use 64-layer SLC NAND, which explains its eye-watering price of $40,000. For comparison, the cheaper ExaDrive NL 64TB from the same company is likely to use 96-layer TLC NAND chips, which slashes its price to a mere $10,900 – less than half the cost per TB.

    > Micron’s new technology could either mean more SSD for your money (e.g. 100TB for $10,000) or far lower price points. Ultimately, the firm wants to drive aggressive, industry-leading cost reductions that will hopefully trickle down to the end user.

    One quarter of the cost.

  22. That won’t happen for another 5 years, that’s affordable.